• Delta Ligero custom car build update – September 2017

    September 30th, 2017 | by
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    The latest developments on the Ligero prototype build have been work around the cockpit area. Will and the team at Joe Bradley Fibreglass have created a mould for the windscreen surround of the donor Boxster for use in the Ligero. The rationale behind this is to be able to use a Boxster windscreen rather than custom glass, with the added benefit of the Boxster windscreen having the rearview mirror attached, thus solving that problem as well. The mould and initial part came out fantastically.

    Next step was to start positioning the windscreen surround to get the angles right for the driving position as well as the roofline. The wooden frame in the following photos can be seen to allow adjustment of the windscreen positioning. Once the right angle and height were achieved, the angles and dimensions for the supporting metalwork could be determined – which will be the next phase of the build and will then in turn dictate the roof structure. 

    In keeping with the theme of using as many donor parts from the Boxster as possible, the dash from the Porsche has also been transplanted. The goal here is to create a space frame for the Ligero with the exact mounting points found on the front firewall of the Boxster to allow the dash assembly to be relatively simply plugged in to it. 

    Other ongoing work has been the transplant of the Boxster steering rack. The length of the rack is significantly shorter in our application, however we’re hoping that a simple cutting and shortening of the column splines should work. 

    An  updated video walk around of the prototype can be found at Delta’s Youtube channel. 

    I’m also excited to report that I’ve secured a power plant for the prototype. The initial plan was to use the Boxster drive chain for this prototype and then evolve the car to have more horsepower for the next build. Owing to the fact that we had initially built the engine bay to house an AMG 5.5L V8, it turned out to be too narrow to fit the Boxster flat 6. Rather than butcher the engine bay I decided to jump straight to the V8 evolution of the car for this initial build. The engine I’ve purchased is an LS3 from a worked HSV which is rated to around 550hp and well over 700nm torque! The plan is to mate it to a Boxster S transaxle through a custom adapter plate and clutch. I think that 550hp will well and truly get the car going as well as it looks like it should. 

    Thanks for following. Cheers, dan

  • Delta Ligero custom car July build update

    July 22nd, 2017 | by
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    The team have been working hard on transplanting the dash from the Boxster into the Ligero prototype. Those of you who have been following the build for a while will know that we were initially planning to use a Mercedes AMG mid clip grafted onto the space frame as a solution for the dash and windscreen. As much as that would have simplified the build, we couldn’t get a driving position that we were happy with due to lack of cabin space, and furthermore it wasn’t going to be reproducible for potential future cars. In the following photos it can be seen that clamps are holding the dash in place whilst it is adjusted to get the position just right for the driver, as well as for the windscreen angle, which will subsequently drive the roof build. 

    Once the dash and windscreen position has been determined it will be possible to finalise the plug for the front clip and then start the mould creation for the first front panels. The other thing that we need to consider is the style of headlights for the car. I’ve got a few ideas.

    Work on the outrageous rear wing is also coming along, here’s the latest mock up. An off the shelf black aluminium wing can be seen positioned on the rear deck of the car, this is being used for styling cues and as a guide for mounting mechanisms for our wing. Of note, the black wing is about 160cm wide, giving some perspective as to just how wide the Ligero prototype is! The other two rectangular foam structures on the rear deck are the plugs for the rear snorkel air outlets. 

     

    Thanks for looking, dan.

     

  • Custom car wheel arch and engine air intake development

    June 21st, 2017 | by
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    The crew at Joe Bradley Fibreglass have been hard at work filling in the missing pieces of the back end of the Ligero, and it’s beginning to look more and more like a car every week! The first matter of business were wheel arches, and after looking at options to fabricate them out of sheet aluminium it was decided that fibreglass was in fact the way to go, and they’ve come up a treat.

     

    It’s a snug fit between the radiator hosing and the front of the wheel arches, but it all shoehorns in nicely.

    Making the wheel arches mate up neatly with the removable rear clamshell has taken some finesse, but Will from JBF is more than equal to the task, creating intricate returns and brackets where required.

    Also under construction has been the vents to channel air into the engine compartment, as well as wooden mock ups of a couple of nostril vents that we plan to have on either side of the rear deck of the car to let the hot air out. 

    The donor Boxster is currently being carefully dissected, with its vital organs being removed for transplant to breathe life into the Ligero. Whilst the Boxster will not provide the power that we want for the car, it is being used for simplicity at this point to get the prototype to the road testing phase. A separate project is underway for a 500hp engine option to be the evolution of the species, but for now we’re going to walk before we run…

    Until next time. Dan.

  • Custom car build update: Delta Ligero June 2017

    June 12th, 2017 | by
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    After a few months of delays and planning work, Delta is kicking off the next phase in construction of our Ligero prototype. The fiddly jobs of plumbing in the radiators and mapping out the exhaust system are complete, and after a lot of deliberation we’ve decided to change tack with the power plant for the Ligero. Whilst the AMG donk and Porsche 996 combo would have been perfect for the task, it proved to be a little complicated and expensive for what we wanted for the car. Furthermore, with a view to limited production of the cars, that combination would be a little too unique for reliable sourcing of parts for future cars. With all that in mind, we’ve decided on a Porsche Boxster as the organ donor for the drive train for our prototype. By cutting away the AMG donor, we’ve also liberated ourselves of the constraints of the AMG mid-clip that we had planned to use for the centre of the car, and was causing us headaches in the cabin and leg space departments. It’s been back to the drawing board to some degree with the new plan, but in the long run we feel that it will be a much better solution. The Porsche engine will obviously not supply the power of the AMG engine, but we have a plan for that as well! First things first however, we want to get an operational prototype on the road and then look to refine the car by trimming weight and adding power. 

    Here’s a few shots of the car as it stands:

    The rear bodywork has had its cut lines inserted to allow for a section to be removable to give access to the mechanicals for servicing. The remainder of the middle bodywork seen will be bonded to the space frame. 

    We’re now in the process of creating ductwork to create airflow from the side intakes over the radiators and into the engine compartment. There’s a video walk around of this below to show the progress in that department.

    It’s all systems go now on the development of the front and cabin sections of the car now. We’ve sourced a Porsche Boxster donor car, and the process of transferring the components we need from it is also underway. More to follow soon!

  • Delta Ligero custom radiators are in place!

    March 25th, 2017 | by
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    Work has been progressing at a steady pace on the Delta Ligero prototype, with Andrew at Tricky Performance Engineering honing in on the rear end of the car and concentrating on the radiator and exhaust systems. The main consideration for the radiator setup for the car was naturally primarily to provide an abundance of cooling capacity for whatever engine the Ligero ends up getting, with a little extra capacity to account for forced induction if we go down that path. A secondary consideration was the weight impact of the radiators and their full coolant load, with the goal of the system as low to the ground, and as close to the centre of the car as possible to minimise any potential impact on handling. After considering all of our options for single versus twin radiator systems, and various mounting positions, we went with a set of RX7 type radiators mounted one on either side of the car, just aft of the rear wheels. This position will allow optimal airflow to be ducted from the hip and shoulder air intakes of the car, through the radiators, and then out through the vents in the back panel. Once sourced, the radiators had to be modified somewhat to suit our needs, and all the piping in and out is custom.

    The radiators fit snugly inside the rear wheel arch, in between the outer bodywork and the 45 litre aluminium fuel tanks on either side.

     

    From the rear of the engine bay looking forward the view looks like this:

    We’re expecting the exhaust cans to come back from the fabricator in the next week or so and their mounts are eagerly awaiting their arrival! 

    The mockup of the exhaust cans, as well as their dimensions drawn on the outside of the bodywork,  can be seen below. 

    The plan will be for the car to head back to Joe Bradley Fibreglass once the exhaust cans are in place for the next phase of bodywork to complete the rear wheel arches and a duct system to feed the radiators and vent hot air out through the back of the car.

    Thanks for looking! Until next time…

     

  • Custom fuel tanks. Welding and fabrication artistry!

    November 30th, 2016 | by
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    The 5.5L AMG power plant is going to need plenty of juice to keep it from going thirsty! Having stage one of the chassis completed allowed us to have twin fuel tanks fabricated to fit one on either side of the engine bay. The work that the contractor did on their construction was nothing short of art. They will fit snug and low in the chassis to keep the centre of gravity way down near mother earth, and will be connected via a pipe running through the engine bay. At 45 Litres a piece, they will be capable of holding plenty of fuel to keep the big V8 happy!

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